2011 Top Ten Best Ramen Restaurants in Tokyo 1/2

Ramen Kiraboshi

Ramen Kiraboshi

The February 2011 issue of Shokuraku magazine lists not only the top ten new ramen shops in Tokyo, but also their selection of top ten ramen shops in the metropolis. As most of this information only appears in Japanese I hope by including it in this blog that more people can come to explore these popular ramen shops. This post includes numbers ten to six.

10. Ramen Kiraboshi ラーメン きら星

Musashino-shi, Sakai Minamimachi 3-11-13

0422-30-0233

11:30 – 15:00, 17:30 – 21:00 (or when supplies run out)

closed Thursday

http://r.tabelog.com/tokyo/A1320/A132003/13009991/ (Japanese)

The broth here is “dorokei soup” or a rich and hearty tonkotsu (pork bones). The noodles are thick and curly.

Niboshi Iwashi Ramen En

Niboshi Iwashi Ramen En

9. Niboshi Iwashi Ramen En 煮干鰮らーめん 園

Hachioji-shi, Yokoyama-cho 21-21

No phone

11:00 – 13:30, 17:00 – about 19:30 (or until supplies last)

closed Wednesday

http://www7.atwiki.jp/8ramen/pages/400.html (Japanese)

http://r.tabelog.com/tokyo/A1329/A132904/13091258/ (Japanese)

The broth is flavored with a lot of niboshi (dried sardines) for a seafood flavored stock. The egg based noodles are also popular for being very delicious.

Muteppou Tokyo Nakano Ten

Muteppou Tokyo Nakano Ten

8. Muteppou Tokyo Nakano Ten 無鉄砲 東京中野店

Nakano-ku, Egota 4-5-1

03-5380-6886

11:00 – 15:00, 18:00 – 23:00 (or until supplies last)

closed Monday

http://www.muteppou.com/mainmenu.html#1 (Japanese)

http://r.tabelog.com/tokyo/A1321/A132104/13114507/ (Japanese)

This is the first shop in Tokyo for the popular brand from Kansai (Osaka area). Muteppou is known for its rich tonkotsu (pork bones) stock. This is also on the list for top 10 new ramen shops in Tokyo.

Menya Shichisai

Menya Shichisai

7. Menya Shichisai 麺や 七彩

Nakano-ku, Saginomiya 3-1-12

03-3330-9266

11:30 – 16:00

18:00 – 24:00

closed third Tuesday of every month

http://r.tabelog.com/tokyo/A1321/A132104/13040728/ (Japanese)

The shoyu (soy sauce) ramen is known for having a good balance, the noodles, the soup, and the toppings make for a perfect bowl of ramen.

Ramen Hajime

Ramen Hajime

6. Ramen Hajime らあめん~Hajime~ 元

Itabashi-ku, Sakashita 2-16-11

03-5392-9567

11:30 – 14:30, 18:00 – 21:00 (or until supplies last) Tuesday – Friday

11:30 – 14:30 (or until supplies last) weekend and holidays

closed Monday

http://r.tabelog.com/tokyo/A1322/A132205/13090786/ (Japanese)

Come here for the shio (salt) ramen. The soup is a blend of chicken and seafood.

For the top ten best ramen restaurants in Tokyo 2/2:

https://foodsaketokyo.wordpress.com/2011/05/19/2011-top-ten-best-ramen-restaurants-in-tokyo-22/

 

2012 Best New Ingredients Ramen

https://foodsaketokyo.wordpress.com/tag/2012-best-ramen/

 

For the top ten new ramen shops for 2011:

https://foodsaketokyo.wordpress.com/2011/05/18/2011-top-ten-best-ramen-restaurants-in-tokyo-12-2/

https://foodsaketokyo.wordpress.com/2011/05/13/2011-top-ten-new-ramen-restaurants-in-tokyo-22/

 

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2011 Top Ten New Ramen Restaurants in Tokyo (2/2)

Baisenshio Soba Dokoro Kinjito

Baisenshio Soba Dokoro Kinjito

New Old Style Niku Soba Keisuke

New Old Style Niku Soba Keisuke

Hongare Chuka Soba Gyorai Siphon

Hongare Chuka Soba Gyorai Siphon

Hongare Chuka Soba Gyorai Toppings

Hongare Chuka Soba Gyorai Toppings

Hongare Chuka Soba Gyorai

Hongare Chuka Soba Gyorai

Muteppou Tokyo Nakano Ten

Muteppou Tokyo Nakano Ten

The February 2011 issue of Shokuraku magazine lists the top ten new ramen shops in Tokyo. As most of this information only appears in Japanese I hope by including it in this blog that more people can come to explore these new restaurants.

3. (tied for third) Baisenshio Soba Dokoro Kinjito 焙煎汐蕎麦処 金字塔

Kita-ku, Akabane 1-62-5

03-5249-0355

11:30 – 24:30 (last order), open daily

http://www.hotpepper.jp/strJ000765396/ (Japanese)

The soup is based on both chicken and pork. The restaurant also does monthly specials.

3. (tied for third) New Old Style Niku Soba Keisuke 肉そばけいすけ

Koto-ku, Sumiyoshi 2-25-1

03-3846-1040

11:00 – 23:10 (last order), open daily

http://www.grandcuisine.jp/keisuke/nikusoba.html (Japanese)

These hearty bowls are loaded with sliced cha-shu pork.

2. Hongare Chuka Soba Gyorai 本枯中華そば  魚雷

Bunkyo-ku, Koishikawa 1-8-6, Arushion Bunkyo Koishikawa 102

03-5842-9833

11:00 – 15:00, 18:00 – 23:00 (or until supplies last)

closed Wednesday

http://bond-of-hearts.jp/shop_gyorai.html (Japanese)

A very unique concept where the soup is dispensed from a siphon and the toppings are served separately (see photos above). While I prefer to have my ramen assembled by the restaurant (the whole reason for going out to eat right?) it is a curious concept and one I imagine brings in a lot of customers. The soup is a W or a blend of two types, seafood and chicken and includes kombu dashi.

1. Muteppou Tokyo Nakano Ten 無鉄砲 東京中野店

Nakano-ku, Egota 4-5-1

03-5380-6886

11:00 – 15:00, 18:00 – 23:00 (or until supplies last)

closed Monday

http://www.muteppou.com/mainmenu.html#1 (Japanese)

With branches throughout Japan this is the first shop in Tokyo. Muteppou is known for its rich tonkotsu (pork bones) stock.

The other top ten new ramen restaurants are at this link:

https://foodsaketokyo.wordpress.com/2011/05/12/2011-top-ten-new-ramen-restaurants-in-tokyo/

2011 Top Ten New Ramen Restaurants in Tokyo 1/2

Mendokoro Kei

Mendokoro Kei

Chuka Soba Ranchu

Chuka Soba Ranchu

Menya Taika

Menya Taika

Mensoken Kanade Kurenai

Mensoken Kanade Kurenai

Menya Itou

Menya Itou

The February 2011 issue of Shokuraku magazine lists the top ten new ramen shops in Tokyo. As most of this information only appears in Japanese I hope by including it in this blog that more people can come to explore these new restaurants.

10. Mendokoro Kei 麺処 慶

Saitama-ken, Ageoshi-shi, Koizumi 69-8

No phone available

11:30 – 15:00, 18:00 – 21:00 (or until supplies last)

closed Wednesday

http://r.tabelog.com/saitama/A1104/A110401/11024040/ (Japanese)

Known for its miso ramen that is rich and thick in flavor. The miso is grilled with lard and a bit of sansho giving it a very unique taste.

9. Chuka Soba Ranchu 中華蕎麦 蘭鋳

Suginami-ku, Horinouchi 2-13-13

03-6319-1045

12:00 – 14:00, 18:00 – 24:00 closed Sunday and holidays

Saturday 12:00 – 15:00 (or until supplies last)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/53664757@N05/4973192598/sizes/l/in/photostream/ (map in Japanese)

http://r.tabelog.com/tokyo/A1319/A131903/13113532/ (Japanese)

The broth is flavored with niboshi (dried sardines) for a lighter flavored clear soup.

8. Menya Taika 麺や 太華

Kanagawa-ken, Yokohama-shi, Totsuka-ku, Totsukacho 16-1, Totsukana Mall 5F

045-871-0915

11:00 – 21:00, open daily

http://totsukana-mall.net/092.html (Japanese)

The soup is based on chicken and soy sauce.

7. Mensoken Kanade Kurenai 麺創研かなで 紅

Fuchu-shi, Miyamachi 1-3-10

042-367-0272

11:30 – 22:00, open daily

http://www.mensoken.jp/index.html (Japanese)

The Kurenai ramen is made with rice miso and a blend of seven different noodles for a variety of textures.

5. (tied for fifth) Menya Itou 麺屋 一燈

Katsushika-ku, Higashi Shin Koiwa 1-4-17

03-3697-9787

11:00 – 15:00, 18:00 – 22:00 (or until supplies last)

closed Monday (if Monday is a holiday they will be closed the following day)

http://kiseki-dream.com/ (Japanese)

Looking at their menu one option is nokomen, or ramen in a rich-flavored broth. But what caught me by surprise is that shio (salt) ramen is served on Wednesday, Friday, and Sunday and shoyu (soy sauce) ramen is served the other days. Definitely looks like a place worth checking out.

5. (tied for fifth) Tsukemen Senmonten Mukyoku  つけ麺専門店 無極

Nakano-ku, Maruyama 2-1-1

03-3338-9998

11:00 – 21:00 (or until supplies last)

closed Monday

http://r.tabelog.com/tokyo/A1321/A132104/13114501/ (Japanese)

The ramen and dipping broth are served in two different bowls, tsukemen-style. The noodles are thick (all the better to dip with) and the dipping broth is rich tonkotsu (pork bones) based soup.

The top four new ramen shops are at this link:

https://foodsaketokyo.wordpress.com/2011/05/13/2011-top-ten-new-ramen-restaurants-in-tokyo-22/

Food Sake Tokyo Update – Nebariya in Hatagaya is closed

UPDATE to Food Sake Tokyo:

Nebaryiya, a restaurant specializing in natto and other sticky and slimy foods has closed. This is mentioned in the natto section in Food Sake Tokyo.

Natto, fermented soybeans known for its stinky aroma and slimy texture, is one food that may be hard for non-Japanese to appreciate. Popular at breakfast in Japan natto is stirred using chopsticks until it is thick and sticky. Soy sauce and Japanese mustard may be stirred in to the natto before it is spooned over a bowl of rice. Condiments-such as grated daikon, leeks, bonito flakes, sea vegetables, pickled apricots (umeboshi), Japanese basil, and in some parts of Japan, apples or sugar-may be added. Dried natto with nori and other seasonings (furikake) is often sprinkled over hot rice. Dried natto beans are a popular beer snack.

Not all natto is the same. It varies according to the size of beans: large, medium, or small; whether the beans are choppped or not; the type of bean used. Most natto is sold in plastic containers, but natto wrapped in straw will have a richer aroma, texture and flavor.

Natto can also be used as a topping for pasta, or as a filling for deep-fried tofu parcels, or as an addition to fried rice or an omelet. In another dish, called bakudan (literally, “bomb”), natto is mixed with a raw egg yolk, okra, slimy potato, squid, and raw tuna resulting in a very healthy, very slippery, very slimy mixture that is  eaten over rice.

Devotees of natto use special natto chopsticks that are designed to make the natto stickier when stirred.

Nebariya ねばり屋 – CLOSED!

Shibuya-ku, Hatagaya 2-48-2, Ei Building B1 渋谷区幡ヶ谷2−48−2英ビルB1

Tel. 03-5358-8257

11:30 – 23:00, no holidays

r.tablelog.com/Tokyo/A1318/A131807/13009202 (Japanese)

Nebari means sticky, and this basement mom and pop restaurant specializes in what may be considered Japan’s stickiest food, natto. The menu is composed of simple rice bowls (donburi) of natto served with accompaniments such as spicy fermented cabbage (kimchi), okra, slimy potatoes, and raw tuna. The counter seats around the open kitchen allow you to watch your meal being assembled. On the street in front of the shop is a menu board with photos of popular set menus.

Yamagata San-Dan-Delo ヤマガタ サンダンデロ

San-Dan-Delo Interior

San-Dan-Delo Interior

Chef Masayuki Okuda

Chef Masayuki Okuda

San-Dan-Delo

San-Dan-Delo

San-Dan-Delo Lunch

San-Dan-Delo Lunch

Yamagata San-Dan-Delo was featured in Food & Wine’s Tokyo City Guide 2011.

Yamagata’s abundant natural resources produce seafood from both the Japan Sea and rivers, wagyu and pork, rice, and produce. Chef Masayuki Okuda’s Italian restaurant in Yamagata, Al-che-cciano  became a destination restaurant with diners traveling from around the country to dine there. Al-che-cciano is in Tsuruoka city of the Shonai region of Yamagata. Yamagata San-Dan-Delo in Ginza showcases products like oysters, Yonezawa wagyu simply prepared with an Italian influence. Chef Okuda recently collaborated with Slow Food in Italy showing his work with local ingredients.

Year-round look for Shonai rice, Shonai pork, and Yonezawa wagyu. In the spring Yamagata is known for its strawberries, bamboo shoots and other sansai (spring mountain vegetables). Summer is the time for cherries, iwagaki (oysters) katakuchi garei (a type of flounder), dadacha mame (soybeans), and peaches. The fall brings kabu (turnips), La Furansu pears, and Hirata akanegi (red leeks). While winter produce include nagaimo (Japanese sticky yam), kandara (winter cod), and asatsuki (chives).

Yamagata San-Dan-Delo 

Chuo-ku, Ginza 1-5-10, Oishii Yamagata Plaza 2F

Phone: 03-5250-1755

http://oishii-yamagata.jp/02sandandelo/ (Japanese)

www.alchecciano.com/profile.html (Al-che-cciano website – Japanese)

* photos are all from the Yamagata San-Dan-Delo website

Setouchi Ryori Suminoe 瀬戸内料理すみのえ

Grilled Tachiuo

Grilled Tachiuo

Grilled Sazae

Grilled Sazae

Simmered Kijihata

Simmered Kijihata

Taimeshi

Taimeshi

Setouchi Ryori Suminoe was featured in Food & Wine’s Tokyo City Guide in the May 2011 issue.

The fourth generation chef, Yasufumi Ootani, from a Hiroshima ryokan (traditional guest house), Suminoe Ryokan, has opened a restaurant in Tokyo. Seafood is flown in daily from the Setonaikai area (inland Sea of Japan). Sazae (turban shell) grilled in its shell, oysters steamed in sake served with ponzu, and tairagai (pen shell) in a savory custard (chawanmushi). Jizake (local sake), like Taketsuru, from Hiroshima is the perfect partner for the local seafood. Closed for lunch, dinner kaiseki from 8,000 yen.

Seafood to look for from this region include kaki (oysters), iwashi (sardines), madai (sea bream), tako (octopus), tachiuo (cutlass fish), anago (conger eel), and mebaru (rockfish).

Chuo-ku, Ginza 8-7-18, Getsukousou B1

中央区銀座8-7-18月光荘ビルB1

Phone: 03-3572-2155

http://www.ginza-suminoe.com/index.html (Japanese)

Ginza Ibuki 銀座一二岐

Seared Katsuo

Seared Katsuo

Grilled Nodoguro

Grilled Nodoguro

Saikyo Miso Grilled Fish 1000 Yen Lunch

Saikyo Miso Grilled Fish 1000 Yen Lunch

Ginza Ibuki is one of the restaurants in the current issue of Food & Wine’s Tokyo City Guide 2011.

Chef Sadahisa Yoshizawa trained for eight years in Kyoto before breaking out on his own. The seafood of Kochi prefecture is featured in this intimate restaurant. The signature dish is seared katsuo (bonito) garnished with thinly sliced garlic, freshly grated wasabi, and salt. Nodoguro himono, black throat that is butterflied, dried overnight, then grilled. Nodoguro is rich with fat and the meat has an inherent sweetness to it. Rice cooked with aromatic matsutake mushrooms and hamo (conger eel). Lunch sets start at 1,000 JPY, dinner kaiseki courses start at 10,000 yen.

Seafood from Kochi prefecture to look out for include katsuo (skipjack tuna), saba (mackerel), noresore (baby eels), kibinago (silver-stripe round herring), kinmedai (splendid alfonsino), madai (snapper), and hamo (pike eel).

Chuo-ku, Ginza 2-14-6, Dai Ni Matsuoka B1

東京都中央区銀座2-14-6 第2松岡ビルB1

Phone: 03-6278-8110

No website

* photos on this post have all come from other blogs

Food & Wine’s Tokyo City Guide 2011

Tokyo Tower

Tokyo Tower

My favorite writing assignment each year is the Tokyo Go List for Food & Wine magazine (the current May issue). This year focuses on three restaurants in the notable Ginza shopping district that features cuisine from three different prefectures in Japan. The chefs at each of these places are all getting a lot of press not only for their abilities in the kitchen, but also for their expression of the local ingredients featured in their shops.

http://www.foodandwine.com/articles/the-tokyo-city-guide

GINZA IBUKI

At Ginza Ibuki, chef Sadahisa Yoshizawa focuses on seafood from Japan’s Kochi prefecture, like blackthroat fish that he butterflies, dries overnight and then grills.

Ginza 2-14-6, Dai Ni Matsuoka B1

Chuo-ku, Tokyo

Phone: 011-81-3-6278-8110

No website

SETOUCHI RYORI SUMINOE

Fourth-generation chef Yasufumi Otani flies in seafood from the Seto-naikai area for his kaiseki menu at Setouchi Ryori Suminoe.

Ginza 8-7-18, Getsukousou B1

Chuo-ku, Tokyo

Phone: 011-81-3-3572-2155

YAMAGATA SAN-DAN-DELO

Foodies make pilgrimages to Masayuki Okuda’s Italian-influenced restaurant in the northern prefecture of Yamagata; now he shows off the area’s ingredients, like Yonezawa wagyu at Yamagata San-Dan-Delo.

Oishii Yamagata Plaza 2F

Ginza 1-5-10, Chuo-ku

Phone: 011-81-3-5250-1755

http://oishii-yamagata.jp/02sandandelo/ (Japanese)

www.alchecciano.com/profile.html (Al-che-cciano website – Japanese)

Chef Seiji Yamamoto of Nihonryori Ryugin 日本料理龍吟の山本征治

Chef Seiji Yamamoto photo by Jun Takagi

Chef Seiji Yamamoto photo by Jun Takagi

Avant-gardist Seiji Yamamoto of Nihonryori Ryugin once silk-screened bar codes onto plates with squid ink. His latest shocker: He’s embracing Japanese classics, as in his rice steamed with shamo (chicken).

Ryugin

Minato-ku, Roppongi 7-17-24, Side Roppongi Bldg, 1st Floor

03-3423-8006

http://www.nihonryori-ryugin.com/ (English)

Food & Wine 2010 Tokyo Go List

Here’s a piece I wrote on chef Yamamoto for The Japan Times.

Yoshoku – Yoshikami in Asakusa

Beef Stew at Yoshikami

Yoshikami in Asakusa is famous for its beef stew. Tender beef in a demi-glace sauce. Other popular dishes include the omuraisu (omelet enveloping ketchup flavored rice) and croquettes. The feel of the restaurant is like a diner from the 50s in the USA. Be sure to get a seat at the counter where you can watch the food being cooked in the open kitchen.

Yoshikami is a short walk from the temple Sensoji.

Yoshikami ヨシカミ

Taito-ku, Asakusa 1-41-4 台東区浅草1-41-4

03-3841-1802

http://www.yoshikami.co.jp (in Japanese)