Shibuya D47

D47 Tokushima

D47 Tokushima Sōmen

D47, on top of the Shibuya Hikarie building, is a restaurant the specializes in regional dishes from throughout Japan. The menu changes monthly and is a great chance to try kyōdo ryōri, hyper-regional cuisine, in Tokyo.

The above dish is sōmen from Tokushima. These summer noodles are normally very thin and served cold. These are much thicker than usual and bringing a richer texture and flavor to what is usually a light meal.

D47 Nagano

D47 Nagano Rōman

This second plate was from back in March while Tokyo was still waiting to warm up. I ordered this as I have a soft spot in my heart for paté and cured meats from Nagano. The main dish, Rōman, is a stir-fry of vegetables and meat, in this case, duck.

The wine list at D47 features Japanese wines by-the-glass including some of my favorites, Yamanashi Grace Winery Koshu and Tochigi Coco Farm Awa Coco. Diners can do a flight of Japanese wine as well. There is also a rich selection of Japanese tea.

The restaurant has floor to ceiling windows that overlook Shibuya station. It’s a popular restaurant, so time your visit accordingly. And, leave extra time in your schedule to visit their sister exhibit and shop on the same floor.

D47 is part of the d-department business that includes publishing, retail, and restaurants that showcase and keep alive regional cuisine and products. Near the restaurant is a D47 Museum and a D47 retail shop. The shop includes tableware, kitchenware, and food products sourced from artisanal

郷土料理 kyōdo ryōri – regional cuisine

徳島素麺 Tokushima sōmen

長野ローマン Nagano Rōman

食堂 shokudō – dining hall

D47 Shokudō

Shibuya-ku, Shibuya 2-21-8, Hikarie Bldg. 8F 渋谷区渋谷2-21-8, ヒカリエ8F

http://www.d-department.com/jp/shop/d47

Yamagata Dashi

One of my go to side dishes this time of year is Yamagata Dashi, a classic kyōdo ryōri (regional dish) from where my family is from. I didn’t eat it growing up, and only came upon it once I lived in Japan. It’s the perfect dish for summer as the vegetables for Yamagata Dashi are at the peak of their season.

Yamagata Dashi smells like you are in the garden. It has a crunchy texture and depending on how much nattō kombu and okra you use, it can be very slippery. I love the aromatics from the shiso and myōga, the crunch from the cucumbers, and it took a while for me to get used to eating raw eggplant, but I love it now.

The main ingredients are cucumbers, eggplant, myōga (ginger buds), okra, and shiso. Nattō kombu, finely minced dried kombu, is another key ingredient. I picked up this pack of nattō kombu なっとう昆布 or 納豆昆布 at the Yamagata antenna shop in Ginza.

https://foodsaketokyo.com/2011/05/02/yamagata-antenna-shop/

Soak a small amount of the nattō kombu in water while prepping the vegetables.

I like to blanch the okra and remove the seeds, but if you are in a hurry or don’t want to be bothered with turning on the stove, you could mince the okra while raw.

Finely chop the cucumbers, eggplant, and okra. Mince the myōga and shiso.

Combine all of the ingredients in a bowl and season with either soy sauce or tsuyu (seasoned soy sauce used for soba or udon noodles). Serve over rice. If you can’t be bothered cooking rice, use the precooked rice that only needs to be microwaved.

Serve immediately. Best to make only what you can eat as the texture changes if it sits overnight in the refrigerator.

Yamagata Dashi 山形だし

kyōdo ryōri 郷土料理

cucumbers – kyūri 胡瓜

eggplant – nasu 茄子

ginger buds – myōga 茗荷

okra オクラ

shiso しそ

nattō kombu 納豆昆布

Do let me know if you try making this dish. Curious what your reactions are.

 

 

Where to Buy Kit Kats in Tokyo

The best place to buy regional Kit Kats in Tokyo is at the Shokoku Gotochi Plaza. The shop is in the basement mall of Tokyo Station near the Tokyo Ramen Street, across the hallway from Rokurinsha ramen shop.

Kit Kat in Japan makes regional flavors that are usually only sold in that region. The Shokoku Gotochi Plaza features regional food items from throughout Japan, which is why the shop also sells these regional Kit Kats.

https://d.nestle.jp/kitkat/omiyage/

Some examples are wasabi, beni imo (purple sweet potato), azuki, mattcha, hōjicha (roasted green tea), strawberry, and more.

The Tokyo Station underground mall is huge. I get lost in there from time to time and I have a good sense of direction. The underground mall is divided into different sections and the Shokoku Gotochi Plaza is part of an area called “First Avenue Tokyo Station”, in Japanese, “Tokyo Eki Ichibangai”. Here is a map in English:

http://www.tokyoeki-1bangai.co.jp/pdf/floorMap_foreign.pdf

Shop hours are listed as 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., seven days a week.

Shokoku Gotochi Plaza

 

Gotta Get – Okinawa Ryukyu Glass

IMG_3892

Okinawa Ryukyu Glass

Selecting tableware is a very important part of the Japanese dining experience. Glassware is also an integral part of regional expressions in Japan. I am a big fan of the Ryukyu glass from Okinawa. Okinawa is a tropical paradise in Japan. Ryukyu is the name of the former independent kingdom, which is now Okinawa. Ryukyu glass is colorful and on the table it is light and refreshing, like being on the islands.

These glasses are perfect for the local drink, awamori, served on the rocks. But I also use it for milk, juice, and iced coffee. The cups are sturdy and easy to wash.

The Okinawa antenna shop, Washita Shop, in Ginza, has a nice selection of Ryukyu glass on the basement level and one of the staff members is a Ryukyu glass specialist. The selection is constantly changing, so if you live in Tokyo, it is easy to stop by every now and then to see what is in stock.

The first floor of the shop is for food and has Tokyo’s largest selection of awamori. The basement floor has tableware, clothes, and music. The local music is melodic and can be high-spirited, but some of it melancholy.

Better yet, take a trip to Okinawa and start your collection there.

Okinawa Washita Shop

Chuo-ku, Ginza 1-3-9

http://www.washita.co.jp/info/shop/ginza/

awamori  泡盛

Ryukyu glass 琉球ガラス

Okinawa 沖縄

 

Gotta Get – Furikake Pen

We have just returned from a trip to Western Japan and one of my favorite things I brought back as an omiyage for myself is this furikake pen that happens to say yukari on it. Yukari is a furikake made from red shiso leaves that are dried and minced with salt. I love it as a topping over rice, but it also makes for quick pickles when massaged into cucumbers or cabbage. It is also can brighten up a salad dressing or be used as a seasoning for popcorn.

The pen was designed by the president of Mishima, a company that is known for yukari furikake. Mishima is based in Hiroshima. Here is a link to the US site for the furikake:

http://www.mishima.com/cgi-bin/mishima/38021.html

The yukari furikake also comes with bits of dried ume (salted apricots), also oishii.

http://www.mishima.com/cgi-bin/mishima/38020.html

On a recent visit to the Hiroshima antenna shop in Ginza, I see that it is also being sold in Tokyo. The pen cap comes off and can be refilled.

Now, I have my own personalized furikake pen.🙂

 

Tau Setouchi Hiroshima Antenna Shop

Ginza 1-6-10 銀座1-6-10

http://www.tau-hiroshima.jp.e.fk.hp.transer.com/

If you do make it to the Hiroshima antenna shop, ask for some brandy-infused momiji Mi. You’ll thank me later.

 

Gotta Get – Kokuto Black Sugar 沖縄黒糖

Kokuto

Kokuto

Do you know about kokutō? Black sugar that is harvested on the islands south of Kagoshima in Okinawa. It is a dark sugar that is rich in minerals and is 100% natural sugar cane. We often keep a jar of kokutō on the counter. It makes a nice little snack. Kokutō can be cooked with water to make a syrup for desserts. This with some kinako, roasted soybean powder, over vanilla ice cream, is a combination of flavors that most people love.

A friend of ours is an editor of a famous food magazine in Tokyo. He is a fountain of information and I never share a meal with him without my notebook and pen. At a recent dinner party we were talking about kokutō and he said that each island produces a different flavor of black sugar. Of course, that totally makes sense, but how different could the flavors be?

Shinji picked up five different kokutō at the Washita Okinawa antenna shop in Ginza. Each from a different island. First of all, they all look very different from each other. Who knew? And, drumroll…….they do all taste very different from each other.

Kokuto Packaging

Kokuto Packaging

These small packages are 50 grams each and cost about 200 JPY ($2 USD). Our tasting notes counter-clockwise starting at pink:

  1. Ie-shima 伊江島 (pink) *** Our favorite. Light in color, not too sweet and surprisingly salty. Rich in flavor and very natural. Will go back for this.
  2. Yonaguni-jima 与那国島 (yellow) ** Medium in color. Light in flavor, not as rich as Ieshima. A hint of saltiness. Hard texture and cut into squares.
  3. Iheya-jima 伊平屋島 (blue) * Light in color. For both of us it was too sweet, much like sugar.
  4. Tarama-jima 多良間島 (dark orange) * Dark color and very hard texture. Sweet and rich flavor.
  5. Hateruma-jima 波照間島 (light orange) ** Very dark in color. Blocks are very chewy. Rich mineral flavor.

Overall the Ie-shima was our favorite. We loved that it wasn’t too sweet and the saltiness was a surprise at first, but we came to love it. Most people love kokutō when they try it.

Note on the names. Shima means island in Japanese. Sometimes the pronunciation of shima can change to jima depending on what name comes before it.

Gotta Get – Hiroshima Lemosco

Image

I am addicted to a product called Yuzusco, a yuzu and Tobasco like sauce that is great for pizza, pasta, eggs, you name it. Was thrilled when I cam across this Lemosco at the Hiroshima Antenna Shop in Ginza.

Image

It is very similar to the Yuzusco, but lighter in flavor. Sometimes the Yuzusco can be too intense. Have loved this with food and next on the list of things to try it with will be cocktails, like a Bloody Mary.

This is made from lemons, vinegar, green chili peppers, and salt. No preservatives or additives. This one is from Yamato Foods.

There are so many great condiments in Japan and these make the perfect gift to bring home for friends.

 Hiroshima Antenna Shop TAU

Chuo-ku, Ginza 1-6-10

10:30 – 20:00

Antenna Shops in Nihonbashi

Antenna Shops in Nihonbashi

In a recent survey of Tokyoites the main reason why they go to antenna shops is to pick up regional food products. The next popular answer was that it was interesting to explore antenna shops followed by picking up brochures for future trips to that prefecture. The other big answer was that people were longing for foods and products from their hometown so came to antenna shops to pick these up. Click on the name of the shop for each shop’s website (most likely in Japanese).

Nihonbashi Niigata Kan NICO Plaza #2Chuo-ku, Nihonbashi Muromachi 1-6-5,

Jizake, seafood, and rice are some of the highlights of this antenna shop.

Taisha Tokyo Bldg. 1-2F

03-6214-1612

hours vary

Fukushima Yaesu Kanko Koryu Kan

Fresh fruits, rice, jizake, and sweets.

Chuo-ku, Yaesu 2-6-21, Santoku Yaesu Bldg.

03-3275-0855

10:00 – 19:00

Kyoto Kan

Minutes from Tokyo station’s Yaesu exit, the wagashi at this shop are gorgeous and exquisite.

Chuo-ku, Yaesu 2-1-1, Yanma Tokyo Bldg.

10:30 – 19:00 (closed last Wednesday of each month from March to September)

03-5204-2260

Yamanashi Kan

Yamanashi is known for its fruit and for its wine. There is an unusually large selection of over 100 Yamanashi wine at this shop. I suggest koshu, a white grape that is light, fruity, and easy to pair with most Japanese food.

Chuo-ku, Nihonbashi 2-3-4, Nihonbashi Plaza 1F

10:00 – 19:00 (website says hours may open at 11:00 a.m. to conserve electricity)

03-3241-3776

Oidemase Yamaguchi Kan

My favorite item at this shop is the Hagi-yaki, pottery from Hagi, in pastel colors. I have picked up several teacups here for myself and as gifts. The glaze has fine cracks in it that over time become dark. It is as though the ceramic is alive and aging. This is in the same building as the Yamanashi shop so be sure to stop by both. Nihonbashi Takashimaya is also just down the street from here.

Chuo-ku, Nihonbashi 2-3-4, Nihonbashi Plaza 1F

10:30 – 19:00

03-3231-1863

 

Nihonbashi Shimane Kan

Shimane prefecture’s antenna shop is located across the street from Mitsukoshi department store. Next door there is also a restaurant, Mondo, that features the local jizake and food of Shimane. Lunch set menus are donburi topped with seafood and cost about 1,000 JPY. The antenna shop posts its most popular selling items, all seafood. Most of it is himono, or fish that is butterflied and air-dried, perfect for grilling and serving with some sake. This month’s top sellers include nodoguro (blackthroat), aji (horse mackerel), and karei (flounder).

Chuo-ku, Nihonbashi Muromachi 1-5-3

10:30 – 19:00

 

A list of antenna shops in the Ginza area.

Antenna Shops in Ginza

If you are looking for jizake or shochu from a small producer or an artisanal miso the first place to check out are the antenna shops. Markets that specialize in regional products, usually from a specific prefecture. The Okinawa antenna shop in Ginza has a huge selection of awamori and the Miyazaki antenna shop in Shinjuku brings in a limited amount of premium shochu on the first of each month. Seafood, meat, and fresh produce as well are often sold. Some of the shops will have a restaurant or an eat-in corner. The Yamagata antenna shop has a branch of it’s famous Italian restaurant using Yamagata products.

Here is a list of antenna shops in Ginza, the area with the most number of shops. Here is a list of antenna shops in Nihonbashi.

Osaka Hyakkaten

Over 600 items and an eat-in corner with takoyaki and butaman.

Chiyoda-ku, Yurakucho 2-10-1, Tokyo Kotsu Kaikan 1F

03-5220-1333

10:00 – 22:00

Tokushima and Kagawa Tomoni Ichiba

Sanuki udon, somen, Tokushima ramen, sudachi, jizake, and more.

Chiyoda-ku, Yurakucho 2-10-1, Tokyo Kotsu Kaikan 1F

03-6269-9688

10:30 – 19:30

Hyogo Waku Waku Kan

Tako no kamaage, oden packs, Higashimaru udon, vegetables, and more.

Chiyoda-ku, Yurakucho 2-10-1, Tokyo Kotsu Kaikan B1

03-6273-4133

10:00 – 19:00

Iki Iki Toyama Kan

Over 800 items including masu sushi.

Chiyoda-ku, Yurakucho 2-10-1, Tokyo Kotsu Kaikan B1

03-3231-5032

10:00 – 19:00

Wakayama Kishukan

Over 50 types of umeboshi, jizake, and fruit.

Chiyoda-ku, Yurakucho 2-10-1, Tokyo Kotsu Kaikan B1

03-3216-1615

10:00 – 19:00

Iwate Ginka Plaza

Over 1,500 items, including a Koiwa soft cream corner.

Chuo-ku, Ginza 5-15-1, Nankai Tokyo Bldg. 1F

03-3254-8282

10:30 – 19:00

Gunma-chan Chi

Produce, sweets, and jizake with an event space on the 2nd floor.

Chuo-ku, Ginza 5-13-19, Duplex Ginza Tower 5/13

03-3546-8511

10:00 – 19:00

Oishii Yamagata Plaza

Jizake, fruits, vegetables, and an Italian restaurant incorporating Yamagata’s produce by star chef Masayuki Okuda at San Dan Delo.

Chuo-ku, Ginza 1-5-10, Ginza First Five Bldg.

03-5250-1752

10:00 – 20:00

Kagoshima Yurakukan

A large selection of shochu, restaurant, and much more.

Chiyoda-ku, Yurakucho 1-6-4, Chiyoda Bldg. 1-3F

03-3580-8821

hours vary

Tottori Plaza

Rakkyo, nagaimo, seafood, Italian restaurant featuring Tottori products, and more than 1,500 items.

Minato-ku, Shinbashi 2-19-4 SNT Bldg.

03-5537-0575

10:00 – 21:00

Ginza Kumamoto Kan

Fruits and vegetable, seafood products, and more than 1,000 items. ASOBI Bar on the 2nd floor featuring Kumamoto shochu, basashi (horsemeat sashimi), and karashi renkon.

Chuo-ku, Ginza 5-3-16

03-3572-1261

11:00 – 20:00

ASOBI Bar 17:00 – 20:00

Marugoto Kochi

Sweets, jizake, and a restaurant on the 2nd floor.

Chuo-ku, Ginza 1-3-13, Ri-burekkusu Tower

03-3538-4351

hours vary

Okinawa Ginza Washita Shop

An impressive selection of awamori in the basement and fresh produce such as go-ya.

Chuo-ku, Ginza 1-3-9, Maruito Ginza Bldg.

03-3535-6991

10:30 – 20:00

Iwate Antenna Shop in Higashi-Ginza 岩手銀プラアンテナショップ

Tantai Sobacchi

Tantai Sobacchi

Sanriku Seafood

Sanriku Seafood

Morioka Reimen

Morioka Reimen

Wagyu Bento

Wagyu Bento

Iwate prefecture’s antenna shop is located across the street from the Kabukiza theater. This was a great place to get your bento lunch if attending a kabuki show. The theater is closed at the moment as a new theater is being built, scheduled to reopen in the pring of 2013. However, the bentos have not disappeared and are a popular item as the bentos are brought in daily from Iwate. The wagyu bento is very popular. Also be sure to check out the seafood based bentos.

Seafood products are a highlight of the shop. In particular, packaged goods from Nakamuraya 中村家, from Kamaishi city in Iwate. The most popular item currently at the shop is above, awabi and ikura. This with a hot bowl of rice is a meal fit for a king.

A variety of noodles are also available. My personal favorite is the Morioka reimen, cold noodles in a refreshing broth. The noodles are made from potato starch and flour and as a result are very chewy. If you are craving a bowl of reimen there is a branch of the Iwate restaurant chain, Pyon Pyon Sha, in Ginza:

https://foodsaketokyo.wordpress.com/2010/05/14/cheap-eats-in-ginza/     (scroll down to the bottom)

The other noodles from Morioka that are famous are soba and jya jya men (udon noodles with a miso meat sauce and vegetables). You’ll also find these at the Iwate antenna shop.

Iwate Gin Pura Antenna Shop

Chuo-ku, Ginza 5-15-1

03-3254-8282