Ginza Takumi 銀座たくみ

Ginza Takumi

Ginza Takumi

 

Takumi たくみ

Chuo-ku, Ginza 8-4-2

03-3571-2017

11:00 – 19:00 (closed Sunday & holidays)

www.ginza-takumi.co.jp/ (Japanese)

Pottery and other crafts are showcased in this two-story shop on the outskirts of Ginza. There is daily use pottery with reasonable prices starting at 1,000 JPY. The shop features a wide variety of pottery including Mashiko, Tanba, and Onta from the small village in Oita. The second floor has textiles including noren. The staff are very friendly and knowledgeable about their products.

Orimine Bakers near Tsukiji Market 築地のパン屋「オリミネベーカーズ」

Orimine Bakers

Orimine Bakers

Focaccia Shirasu

Focaccia Shirasu

Foccacia Iidako

Foccacia Iidako

A great little bakery near Tsukiji has opened up and is definitely worth checking out if you are in the area. The name of the shop is printed in gold on the windows, reminds me of Balthazar Bakery in Soho. You can’t miss its green and white awning and the green exterior. The breads range from sweet to savory but two in particular that catch my eyes are made with seafood procured from neighboring Tsukiji Market, both focaccia. One is topped with shiso, shirasu (boiled tiny anchovies), and cheese. The other has iidako (octopus) with a puttanesca sauce. There is also a selection of sandwiches. There is a map on the website, which is mostly in Japanese, but enough English to find the map and to see the other great breads.

Thanks to chef and author, Yukiko Hayashi (Gout Sensei) for bringing this shop to our attention! Gout Sensei’s website (in Japanese) is below. She is particularly passionate about soba.

http://gout.cocolog-nifty.com/blog/cat20852746/index.html (Japanese)

Orimine Bakers

Chuo-ku, Tsukiji 7-10-11

03-6228-4555

7:00 – 19:00, closed Sunday and holidays

http://oriminebakers.com/ (mostly Japanese but some basic English and a map)

Yubakichi in Kyoto’s Nishiki Market 京都錦市場の湯波吉

Yubakichi Nishiki

Yubakichi Nishiki

Yuba Namakohikiage

Yuba Namakohikiage

Yubakichi Interior

Yubakichi Interior

Yubakichi’s rich history dates back to 1790. The delicate yuba is made using domestic soybeans. The yuba has a light sweetness to it. You will find both dried and fresh yuba. The fresh yuba is creamy and has a nice texture. This can be served with just wasabi and soy sauce.

Yubakichi 湯波吉

10:00 – 18:00, closed Sundays and the 4th Wednesday of each month

075-221-1372

www.kyoto-nishiki.or.jp/shop/yubakichi/yubakichi.htm (Japanese)

Aritsugu in Kyoto’s Nishiki Market 京都錦市場の有次

Aritsugu Exterior

Aritsugu Exterior

Aritsugu Interior

Aritsugu Interior

Aritsugu 有次

9:00 – 17:30, no holidays

075-221-1091

www.aritsugu.com (Japanese)

Aritsugu has been in business since 1560. Famous for their knives, you will also find an enticing selection of other essential tools for the kitchen including nabe, handcrafted oroshigane (graters), and peelers. Aritsugu also has a shop in Tsukiji Market in Tokyo, but this shop in Kyoto has a wider selection, and is more accustomed to tourists.

Dintora in Kyoto’s Nishiki Market 錦市場のぢんとら

Dintora ぢんとら

Dintora ぢんとら

Dintora ぢんとら

Dintora ぢんとら

Dintora is filled with spices, perfect for any home cook, including dried yuzu, chinpi, ichimi, shichimi, sansho, and karashi. Many of these spices are light and portable so stock up here if you are visiting from abroad. The chinpi (dried citrus peel) can be mixed with honey and hot water when you have a cold, or added to a bath.

Dintora Spice Shop ぢんとら

075-221-0038

closed Tuesdays, if Tuesday is a holiday, it will be open and closed Wednesday

http://homepage2.nifty.com/dintora/ (Japanese)

Ginza Toraya 銀座とらや

Toraya Ginza

Toraya Ginza

Toraya Anmitsu

Toraya Anmitsu

Toraya is a purveyor to the Imperial Family and its rich history can be dated back to the 1600s. The signature item at Toraya is the yokan cakes wrapped in bamboo leaves. This is considered one of the top shops for wagashi, in particular, the yokan. The yokan comes in several flavors including azuki, mattcha, and the kokuto has a rich, deep flavor. Toraya has outlets in most depachika. The main shop is in Akasaka with an eat-in space. The recommended dish is anmitsu

This gorgeous shop in Ginza has a retail shop on the first floor and a café on the second floor. In the summertime you can cool down with a kakigori (shaved ice sweets).

Toraya とらや

Chuo-ku, Ginza 7-8-6

03-3571-3679

9:30 – 20:30, Monday – Saturday

9:30 – 19:30, Sunday and holidays

www.toraya-group.co.jp/english/index.html (English)

CLOSED – Fukumitsuya Sake Shop in Ginza 福光屋

Fukumitsuya

Fukumitsuya

Fukumitsuya Ginza

Fukumitsuya Ginza

Fukumitsuya Bar

Fukumitsuya Bar

Sadly, this gorgeous shop has closed.

Fukumitsuya is a sake shop representing a brewery from Kanazawa that opened in 1625. Rest your feet at the small tasting bar and try a few before purchasing. The bottles are stored in small box refrigerators in the back of the shop, as all good quality sake should be. There is a nice selection of cups and bottles, both traditional and modern, for serving sake at home. Fukumitsuya has a wide selection of sake including Kyoka with gold flakes, aged up to 10 years “Hatsugokoro”, and sake based sparkling cocktails. There is a sugidama (cedar ball) hanging over the door. Traditionally these are used at sake breweries to designate when the sake is done fermenting and is ready to be consumed.

Fukumitsuya also has a shop in Roppongi’s Midtown as well as in Futakotamagawa in the same building as Takashimaya.

Fukumitsuya 福光屋

Chuo-ku, Ginza 5-5-8

03-3569-2291

11:00 – 21:00, Monday – Saturday

11:00 – 20:00, Sunday and holidays

www.fukumitsuya.co.jp/english/index.html (English)

Yamagata Antenna Shop in Ginza – Oishii Yamagata Plaza おいしい山形プラザ

Tama Konnyaku

Tama Konnyaku

The Yamagata antenna shop, Oishii Yamagata Plaza in Ginza is home to chef Masayuki Okuda’s restaurant, San-Dan-Delo (see post below). It is also one of my favorite antenna shops in the city due to the variety of products available. Yamagata has some of my favorite foods, cherries, La Furansu pears, pork, wagyu, rice, sake, and a variety of vegetables. One local product to seek out is tama konnyaku, small balls of konnyaku that comes with its own flavored broth. Simmer and enjoy with some sake.

img_7178

Roasted Brown Rice

One of the great fun parts of exploring antenna shops is that discovering food products you’ve never heard of. On a recent tour with clients we came across these roasted GABA genmai (germinated brown rice), “Motto Yasai o Tanoshiku”, literally having ‘more fun with vegetables’. It’s a great alternative to croutons, super crunchy and somewhat earthy bits.

My mother is from Tsuruoka soI have grown up visiting my grandma’s home and eating lots of the food so of course there is a nostalgic familiarity with the products. But, after eating food from all over the country, Yamagata is truly a treasure chest of great foods from both the sea and the mountains. Some of the best sake comes from here (Juyondai, Dewazakura, Takenotsuyu) as well as wine.

Oishii Yamagata Plaza

Chuo-ku, Ginza 1-5-10

Phone: 03-5250-1750

http://oishii-yamagata.jp/ (Japanese)

Miyagi Antenna Shop in Ikebukuro 宮城アンテナショップ

Miyagi Furusato Plaza

Miyagi Furusato Plaza

One way to show your support for Tohoku is to visit the antenna shops that showcase local products. Antenna shops are an excellent way to find food products and other goods from a specific region, mostly from a specific prefecture. Miyagi prefecture, one of the hardest hits from the earthquake and tsunami is known for its rich coastline that provides for seafood and other products from the sea. A popular omiyage (gift) to bring back from a visit to Miyagi is sasakamaboko. Sasakamaboko are light fish cakes in the shape of bamboo leaves (sasa). These make for a great snack with the local nihonshu.

Miyagi is famous for the following seafood: katsuo, sanma, hotate (scallops), hokkigai, kaki, and awabi (abalone).

One of my favorite sake breweries in Japan is Urakasumi from Miyagi. While working at Takashimaya in Nihonbashi Urakasumi’s Zen was my most recommended nihonshu to customers. You should be able to find some of Urakasumi’s nihonshu at the Miyagi antenna shop.

Other products to look out for include Sanriku wakame. The shop is currently selling wakame that was harvested before the triple disaster. A variety of sweets including many types of daifuku (stuffed rice mochi balls) are also available.

The eat-in counter features the local gyutan, or beef tongue. I prefer it grilled and served with white rice, or you can have it with curry.

Do stop by if you are in the area. It’s a large shop, over two floors. Also, you’ll find travel information

Miyagi Furusato Plaza

Toshima-ku, Higashi  Ikebukuro 1-2-2

03-5956-3511

http://cocomiyagi.jp/data/01English.pdf (website in English)