Kaiseki at Tsukiji Tamura つきぢ田村

Tsukiji Tamura つきぢ田村

Chuo-ku, Tsukiji 2-12-11 中央区築地2-12-11

Tel. 03-3541-2591

11:30 – 15:00, 17:00 – 22:00, Monday – Friday

11:30 – 22:00, weekend and holidays

www.tsukiji-tamura.com

A few blocks away from the market, Tsukiji Tamura is a top destination for kaiseki cuisine by third generation chef Takashi Tamura. His father, Teruaki Takashi has penned a book (Japanese and English) that demystifies many of the rituals of this stylized cuisine, “The Elegant Art of Japanese Food and Manners”. The main dining room has several tables and the noon meal is often filled with ladies who lunch. Private rooms are also available for an extra charge. Lunch is a bargain for the several courses.

Tsukiji Tamura

Tsukiji Tamura

Tsukiji Tamura is just a few blocks away from Tsukiji Market.

Seasonal Winter Dishes

Seasonal Winter Dishes

Just some of what came with this course is pickled renkon (lotus root), Tsukudani fish, nanohana (the greens), sushi wrapped in sakura leaf, grilled tofu with an herbed miso sauce, and octopus.

Sake

Sake

The sake is served in a wooden boat filled with crushed ice, and I love the fresh flowers. The attention to detail here is impressive.

Owan

Owan

Fish meat is ground to a paste for this fluffy ball in dashi broth with bitter greens and mushrooms.

Sashimi Course

Sashimi Course

Note how the squid on the far right is just slightly scored to make it easier to chew on. Again, the attention to detail by the chef is amazing.

Grilled Course

Grilled Course

My favorite course was the grilled fish. Kinmedai (splendid alfonsino) is grilled and served in a broth. So simple, just salted, grilled, presented in a broth with a slice of lemon.

Sansai

Sansai

Scallops with warabi (fern), takenoko (bamboo shoots) and a colorful dressing (I forget, but think it included oranges).

Spring in a bowl

Spring in a bowl

This dish sings of spring with the takenoko (bamboo shoots) and green peas. The pink flower in front is nama fu (wheat gluten).

Shime

Shime

The rice course (shime) was in a broth with mitsuba. As you can see it comes with pickles (handsome husband not included).

Fruit

Fruit

Strawberries are available year-round in Japan due to greenhouses, but you do see more of them in the markets starting in December and January.

Mattcha and Shiruko

Mattcha and Shiruko

And just when we thought we were done, as many kaiseki restaurants end with a fruit course, the kimono-clad waitress came out with a tray with a paper lantern and a picture of Mount Fuji (painted by the father of the chef). This course was a sweet azuki bean soup with mochi dango (sticky rice balls) and mattcha green tea. A great lunch and highly recommended.

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3 thoughts on “Kaiseki at Tsukiji Tamura つきぢ田村

  1. thank you so much for your loving detail of the food here .We will definatly take your recommendation.
    Tanah from New Zealand

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