Sumo 101

When I first lived in Japan in the late 80s, there was a great wrestler named Chiyonofuji, nicknamed “The Wolf”. He was very strong and handsome. I became hooked on sumo. We went to Ryogoku to the Kokugikan stadium in Tokyo and watched from the cheap seats in the last row. A decade later I was invited by a friend of mine who had corporate tickets that were in the front section. It was a night and day experience watching up close. It reminded me of seeing opera in New York City. My first time, as a college student, was standing room tickets in the back of the house. After I moved to NYC and had a budget for orchestra seats, it made a world of difference.

Here are some tips for you to enjoy your sumo experience, notably the food side of things.

The sport has gone through ups and downs in popularity, and now it is hard to get tickets. When we go we prefer to sit up front in the masuseki 升席 seats that are down on the floor. However, if you are not comfortable sitting on tatami mat for a few hours, then you should get seats on the second floor.

Go early and watch the sumo wrestlers as they come in. In Tokyo the top wrestlers walk into the stadium usually between 2 and 3 p.m. They are often escorted by lower-ranking wrestlers from the same beya. Fans line up with cameras to watch them come in. You are surprisingly close. You can clap your hands and wish them good luck, “ganbatte kudasai“. Be sure to check out the backs of their kimonos as there may be lovely designs, such as the kabuki mask on Endo’s back in pink above. On the right is Tochinoshin, from Georgia (the country).

When you go into the stadium, be sure to rent the English-language radio so you can have a play-by-play. There is plenty to see in the stadium, so allow for some time to walk around.

Be sure to get a bowl of chanko nabe. In the stadium there is a banquet room that has serves up a bowl of the famous hot pot that sumo wrestlers eat.

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Bring your own food and beverages. Many sports venues allow customers to bring in their own food. We love bringing in our own food as that way we don’t waste time standing in line. At the Kokugikan you can even bring in your own beer, sake, or wine. Above are inari zushi, deep-fried tofu that is simmered in a sweet soy broth and stuffed with seasoned rice. If you are in Tokyo on holidays, then just stop by a depachika and pick up a bento and a bottle of saké. Ask for small cups at the department store as they usually have tasting cups on hand. Alternatively, a convenient store will have the essentials, beer, onigiri (stuffed rice balls), and chips.

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Watch the wrestlers come on the dohyo. You should be in your seats by 3:45 p.m. (earlier on the final day). This is the only chance you’ll see all of the wrestlers together. At the end of the day, we also like to watch the closing ceremony. One of the wrestlers artistically swings a large bow in a dramatic fashion. The sound of the drums is a sign that the day has come to an end.

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Divide your trash into paper and plastic and discard on your way out.

  • The sumo tournament in Tokyo is in January, May, and September.
  • If something unexpected happens, some spectators will throw their zabuton (cushions) towards the dohyo. It doesn’t happen often, so it’s great fun to witness.
  • Many of the top wrestlers are not Japanese. Many are from Mongolia, but other countries include Bulgaria, Georgia, and Egypt.
  • The trains can be very crowded when the day ends. Consider grabbing dinner or a drink near the stadium before jumping on the train.

Tips for Visiting Tsukiji Market

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These signs are posted at one of the entry points to the inner market (jōnai) of Tsukiji Market. Some great tips here for visiting the inner market.

Most importantly, stay out of the way of the workers. It is a working market, so be aware of workers trying to get around you.

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The inner market opens to the general public at 9:00 a.m.

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Avoid going into the market in large groups.

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So obvious yet there are still visitors pushing around their kiddies in strollers in the inner market.

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Love this. No flip-flop.

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Of course, don’t touch the product.

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Hey dude.

Some other tips for visiting Tsukiji Market include the following:

Wear comfortable shoes that can get wet.

Travel lightly. No large backpacks or rolling suitcases.

Photos are fine, but no flash as the fishmongers are working with knives and it’s dangerous.

Great shops selling knives, tea, and more in the outer market. Note that many of these are cash only shops.

Be sure to check out the Tsukiji Market calendar online to see if it is open. Usually closed every Sunday and every other Wednesday, but not always.

To see what the new Toyosu Market will look like when the inner market of Tsukiji moves, check out the Tokyo Ichiba Project Museum.

Start your morning with Tsukiji’s best coffee at Turret Coffee, which opens at 7 a.m.

We offer tours of Tsukiji Market. Details are here about Food Sake Tokyo tours.

An article I wrote about Tsukiji Market and some key shops worth visiting for The Japan Times.