Tokyo Station Ekiben

Getting a bento 弁当 and riding on one of the express trains from Tokyo station is a ritual that is comes with traveling in Japan. Even on a short ride, like the hour ride to Narita on the Narita Express, we take advantage of the opportunity to enjoy a bento. Above are some bentos that we recently purchased for the Narita Express.

The bento on the top right included many delicacies from the sea like asari clams, ikura salmon roe, and simmered anago sea eel. The bottom right bento is made with 50 different ingredients. It was fun to follow the menu and check off each item.

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Our five-year old loves the shinkansen bento, which come in a variety, based on actual running shinkansen 新幹線. The bento boxes themselves are quite sturdy so we wash them and reuse them at home. The shinkansen bento are about 1,200 – 1,300 JPY and are filled with kid-friendly bites like kara-age chicken, sausage, and fruit jelly. I am reminded by Twitter friends that adults also enjoy this bento.

The above bentos were all purchased at Bentoya Matsuriya 弁当屋祭, a bento shop inside of Tokyo Station. As it is in the station, you will need to purchase a ticket to access the shop. If you are traveling from Tokyo Station to another destination, then you will have access to the shop. If you are already near Tokyo Station and just want to come in to see the shop, then yes, you will need to purchase a ticket to enter the station. It is at Tokyo Station Central Street, between the stairs leading to platforms 5/6 and 7/8. Matsuriya sells over 170 different ekiben 駅弁. Ekiben are bento sold at different eki (stations) throughout Japan. It’s a popular shop and usually very busy. On the wall of the shop is a sample of the different bento for sale, which are brought in from all over Japan.

*Note, the Matsuri website says that it is open from 5:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

For beverages we like to go to Hasegawa Saketen which inside Tokyo Station in the basement in an area called GranSta. There is also a counter for drinking saké if you have the luxury of time on your hands.

*** Note – Hasegawa Saketen has moved to a new location while their original shop in the station is under construction. There is still a shop in the station, about a 1-minute walk from the original location. (The photos above are from the original shop.)

Hasegawa Saketen sells full bottles of sake, shochu, umeshu, and wine. For drinks for the train, look to the far left of the shop where there is a big selection of tea, beer, and smaller servings of sake, beer, and shochu.

If you are riding at a time that is between meals and don’t need a full bento, Hasegawa Saketen sells small bites and saké-friendly snacks.

*Note, the Hasegawa Saketen website says that it is open from 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. (Monday – Saturday) and 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Sunday.

Other good places to pick up bento are throughout Tokyo Station, including in the depachika-like area across the aisle from Hasegawa Saketen, GranSta. Daimaru department store is also next to Tokyo Station and has the biggest selection of bento. If you have time, then come here, and allow yourself time to carefully peruse the options.

* The GranSta website says that it is open from 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. (Monday – Saturday and holidays -except for the last day of a string of holidays). 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. Sunday and last day of a string of holidays.

* Daimaru website says it is open from 10:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. on weekdays. 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. on weekends and holidays.

Once you are on the train, wait for it to depart the station before drinking and eating. It’s part of the ritual. 🙂

When you are done eating, the trains have trash cans for bento and for your drinks.

Enjoy partaking in this fun eating and drinking part of traveling in Japan.

 

 

 

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Tokyo Station’s Popular Ekiben 東京駅人気駅弁

Ekiben are literally bento from different eki or stations in Japan. Part of the pleasure of traveling by train in Japan is sampling a variety of local foods sold in bento boxes at major stations throughout the country. A bento from a coastal village most likely will showcase locally harvested seafood while a mountain village may feature vegetables harvested from the region.

At Tokyo Station there is a shop specializing in bento called “Bentoya Matsuri”, or festival of bentos (photo of shop here). The shop just opened this August and is already very popular. It is located on the first floor in the Central Passage (中央通路). It sells 170 different type of ekiben from all over Japan. It sells about 10,000 ekiben each day. Some ekiben are purchased by travelers transiting through Tokyo station while others are bought by Tokyoites bringing them home to enjoy.

Bentoya Matsuri recently announced the top selling ekiben based on the first two months of sales. It is interesting to note that five of the top six hail from the Tohoku region that was affected by the 3/11 triple disaster. Tohoku is renowned for its cuisine but this may also be a sign of consumers showing their support for Tohoku. The top six are here. Click on the bento name to see a photo if it’s not included.

gyuniku domannaka

1. Gyuniku Domannaka from Yonezawa in Yamagata 1,100 yen (Yonezawa beef)

2. Gokusen Sumibiyaki Gyutan Bento from Sendai in Miyagi 1,300 yen (grilled beef tongue)

Yonezawa Gyu

3. Yonezawa Gyu Sumibiyaki Tokucho Karubi Bento from Yonezawa in Yamagata (Yonezawa beef)

Sendai

4. Miyagi Ougonkaidou from Sendai in Miyagi 1,000 yen (anago, uni, scallop, salmon, and ikura)

5. Miyagi Umi no Kagayaki Benijake Harakomeshi from Sendai in Miyagi 1,000 yen (salmon and ikura)

6. Koshu Katsu Sando from Obuchizawa in Yamanashi 600 yen (tonkatsu sandwich – good even at room temperature)

Ekiben, Hokkaido, and Shimane Food Fairs in Tokyo

Amaebi Donburi

Amaebi Donburi

Today starts three food fairs in Tokyo. Get this amaebi donburi at the Hokkaido Food Fair at Tobu Ikebukuro (8th floor event space) running through January 24th.

Select from over 200 ekiben at Shinjuku Keio’s event also through January 24th.

Shimane Food Fair

Shimane Food Fair

At Shibuya Tokyu Toyoko Ten on the 8th floor is a Shimane Food Fair running through January 18th.

For more information about the depachika at these department stores, please see my list of my favorite depachika in Tokyo.