Best of Japan Tour at Nihonbashi Coredo Muromachi

best of japan map

Food Sake Tokyo is delighted to have guest blogger Janice Espa. Janice is passionate about food and Japan. She is a great photographer and all of the photos here are from Janice. Here is Janice on the Best of Japan Tour now being offered at Coredo Muromachi in Nihonbashi. Arigato Janice!

Coredo Muromachi, in Tokyo’s Nihonbashi area, has launched a special tour; one to taste Japan and learn about regional specialties all within the comfort of the Coredo Muromachi’s recently opened buildings. Escorted by two knowledgeable English-speaking guides, you work your way around the different shops in Coredo Muromachi, see what each shop specializes in, and sample many of the products on sale.

For someone with limited time, or for those unfamiliar with peculiar Japanese creations, this ninety minute introduction to the range of Japanese specialties is top-notch. For the ¥1,000 price tag, it’s a no-brainer. After signing up at Nihonbashi Information Center, which is conveniently located outside Mitsukoshimae Station exit, the tour begins with a description of what you’ll see and the stores you’ll visit that afternoon.

The first stop is Okui Kaiseido 奥井海生堂. The shop sells kombu products from Fukui. There’s a startling shredded kombu, that looks like thick shaves of cotton candy, as well as kombu water that tastes, for lack of more accurate comparison, like a savory version of green tea, or like tea stewed with sea water. It’s odd at first, but refreshing, and something you don’t easily come across or get to sample. (Yukari piping in here – this is one of my favorite kombu vendors in Japan. If you want to buy kombu to take home with you, it is worth making a special trip.)

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Chefs and wagashi at Tsuruya Yoshinobu

I was captivated by the delicate work at the Kyoto Wagashi store Tsuruya Yoshinobu 鶴屋吉信.  There’s a seasonal menu and also a life-size, edible display by the window that is changed every three weeks.  Food this beautiful is hard to conceptualize, but the flavours are as soft and delightful as the exterior.

At Imoya Kinjiro 芋屋金次郎, you skip the queue and go straight to the samples of hot, crispy matchsticks of fried, candied sweet potato – a specialty from Kyushu’s Shikoku Island.  Then you enjoy a cup of creamy amazake, before nibbling on Satsuma-agé from Q-Jiki, a store specializing in Kagoshima’s local favourite fish cakes. (Yukari – The shop is famous as it deep-fries the sweet potatoes in olive oil before coating it in the candy coating. This is a popular selling point as it is deemed better to fry in olive oil than in other oils.)

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Q-Jiki 

At Hakuza Nihonbashi 箔座日本橋, store that specializes in crafts made from gold leaf, there’s an impressive display of Ishikawan artistry, including a gold leaf tower, jewellery, pottery, and edible gold leaf flakes for sale – which would make the most elegant furikaké sprinkled over a bowl of rice.

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Gold leaf sprinkles for sale

At Ninben Nihonbashi Honten にんべん日本橋本店, you learn how katsuo (skipjack tuna or often called bonito) is dried, smoked, and then shaved to make the highest quality fish flakes, followed by a visit to Dashi Bar Hanare, where you taste some warming soup broth.

katsuo anatomy

Katsuo Anatomy

After traveling from North to South, viewing craftsmanship and tasting goods from Hokkaido to Nagasaki, the tour rounds up nicely at Nihonbashi Hashicho 日本橋箸長.  Hashicho sells chopsticks from all over Japan. The merits and regional differences are evident: diverse shapes and materials, from sharp, wooden edges to lacquer choptsicks. The selection is beautiful, and in some cases exorbitant (1 million yen chopsticks available for purchase). A thoughtful way to finish a tour of Japan: seeing it ‘all together’ through chopsticks from all over the country.  Upon conclusion, you receive a small gift as a token of Coredo’s appreciation for your time.  An afternoon spent tasting Japanese delicacies, presented by knowledgeable concierges in modern, beautiful surroundings, is a win-win.

When the tour was done, I lingered around the Coredo buildings for a bit longer, had some iced matcha, and bought food from the basement to take away for dinner.  After samples of fish cakes, kombu, and amazaké, I enthusiastically purchased Hakkaisan saké, tsukuné (chicken meatball) yakitori, and uni with an Italian twist from Riccio Mania’s exclusively designed, sea urchin-centric menu.  Oishii!

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Afternoon tea at Hakuza Nihonbashi

The Best of Japan tour is on every Saturday at 2 pm and 4 pm

Cost ¥1,000

Duration: 90 minutes

Reservations by email guide@nihonbashi-info.jp or by calling 03-3242-0010

Address:
B1 Coredo Muromachi, 2-2-1 Nihonbashi Muromachi, Chuo-ku, Tokyo.

 

Nearest stations:

Mitsukoshimae Station, Exit A6 (Tokyo Metro Hanzomon Line/Ginza Line)

Shin-Nihonbashi Station, direct access (JR Sobu Line Rapid)

 

If you liked this post, please check out Janice’s other post about Kyoto.

Nishiki Market and Kyoto Uzuki Cooking School

Sake Tasting with JD Kai

 

Janice Espa photoJanice Espa

Janice Espa is a Spanish-Peruvian food enthusiast; an avid traveller and inquisitive taster who explores culture through cuisine.  Janice lives in Sydney where she writes and styles food. Her days are spent visiting grower’s markets, checking out restaurants, and shopping at specialty stores to discover goods from every corner of the world.

Feel free to email suggestions and travel tips, or to contact Janice for her own recommendations, whether you’re visiting Peru, trekking South America or doing a road trip along the east coast of Australia.

Email:  janicespa@gmail.com

Gotta Get – Chopsticks at Hashichō in Nihonbashi

 

chopsticks store in Nihonbashi Coredo

Nihonbashi Coredo Hashicho

We eat with our chopsticks two, sometimes three times a day. Having a pair that you really love to eat with makes each meal all the more fun. There are so many factors to consider when selecting chopsticks. The size of your hands will determine the length. The tips can be fine or thick. The chopsticks can be round or beveled. The material can range from a simple bamboo to several layers of lacquer that are polished away to show off the colorful layers.

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Selection of chopsticks at Hashicho

One of my favorite shops is Ginza Natsuno as the selection may be the greatest in Tokyo. Another shop worth checking out is Hashichō in the new Nihonbashi Coredo Building #3. It is a sister shop to Natsuno. Here you will find not only chopsticks, but also hashioki (chopstick rests) and other tableware items.

Hashichō

Chuo-ku, Nihonbashi-Muromachi 1-5-5, Coredo Muromachi Bldg. 3, 2nd floor

03-3277-6033

 

There is also a shop in Roppongi at Midtown (Roppongi 9-7-4) in the Galleria 3rd floor.

Tenmatsu Tempura in Nihonbashi

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Spring is my favorite time of year for tempura as sansai, mountain vegetables, are featured at good restaurants serving tempura. At the top of this box is udo (spikenard), which reminds me of a tender and somewhat bitter white asparagus. The other vegetable is renkon (lotus root). 

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Tenmatsu at Nihonbashi bridge, just between Nihonbashi and Mitsukoshi-Mae stations on the Ginza line, has long been a favorite spot of mine. I used to work at Takashimaya which is just a five-minute walk from here and would sometimes come for a solo lunch. The lunch here is a great bargain at under 1,000 JPY for tempura that is made and served to you piece-by-piece as it comes out of the oil. Here you see the chef’s work spot. Some flour that the ingredients are dipped in before being covered with an egg, flour, and water batter before being deep-fried.

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Here is the udo to start off the meal. At home we blanch udo and then dress it with mayonnaise. But tempura is probably the best way to enjoy it.

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This is a special technique when putting in items to the hot oil, to gently toss away from you into the hot oil. Part of the joy of sitting at the counter at a tempura restaurant is listening to the oil as it sputters. A good tempura chef will know when items are ready to be pulled out of the oil by the sound it makes when it is done frying. On the plate is asparagus and shiitake. My friend got two pieces of shrimp for this course.

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Squid and lotus root. I love the chef’s smile. :-)

In the large round bowl is the chef’s batter mixture. He also uses two different chopsticks. A wooden pair for the flour and batter and then a metal pair for working in the oil.

Tenmatsu is in my book, Food Sake Tokyo. The chef in this photo is the same chef that is in my book. It is quite busy at lunch time so either go early or late. Be sure to request a seat at the counters on the 1st or 2nd floor. The 3rd floor is tables only and you miss out on watching the chef prepare the tempura in front of you. They are open on Sundays and holidays which is good to keep in mind as most shops in this area are closed on these days. The main shop is in Shibuya.

Tenmatsu

Chuo-ku, Nihonbashi Muromachi 1-8-2

03-3241-5840

Lunch 11:00 – 14:00 (Sat., Sun., and holidays until 14:30)

Dinner 17:00 – 21:00

Nihonbashi Tour on November 1st

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Can you tell the difference between the nori on the left and the right?

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Two types of dashi, both using katsuobushi.

What better time to learn about washoku? It seems that UNESCO will recognize the unique cuisine of Japan as an Intangible Cultural Heritage in December.

If you are curious or passionate about Japanese cuisine and would like to know more about it, there will be a 90-minute walking tour of some of the historic shops in Nihonbashi. Learn more about umami, some ingredients from the Japanese pantry, and Japanese cuisine.

The tours are at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 2:30 p.m., and 4 p.m. on Friday, November 1st. The tours are in English.

For more details, please contact me directly. Our e-mail is on our “Yukari and Shinji Sakamoto” page.

Nihonbashi Sapporoya – Hiyashi Chuka Goma Dare

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* I meant to post this in the summer. Sapporoya serves chilled ramen throughout the year.

Tokyo has been unseasonably hot this week. My favorite bowl of cold ramen noodles in the whole city is a great little dive called Sapporoya.The ramen shop happens to be across the street from one of my favorite kaiseki/kappō restaurants, Nihonbashi Yukari. I love that on this narrow street you can find two contrasting meals, both exceptional, at different price ranges.

I used to work in Nihonbashi at Takashimaya department store. I came upon Sapporoya  by chance one night when looking for a quick bite to eat with a girlfriend. It was summer and the cold ramen dish was tempting. The first time I had it I think I picked up the large bowl and sipped up the broth. It is rich in umami and has a nutty sesame sauce that brings the whole dish together. When I went to work the next day at Takashimaya and shared my story with Yamada-san (older man who is a gourmet and introduced me to many great spots), he knew immediately of it. I was advised by Yamada-san that the hot bowls of ramen are also very good here. But, I am addicted to the cold ramen with sesame dressing.

I stopped by this week and was so touched that the owners had remembered me. I haven’t been back in five years, but as soon as I came into the shop I was warmly welcomed. It’s a small restaurant and most of the diners are area businessmen, so I guess as a half-Japanese woman I stick out a bit. Regardless, I was happy to be back. I am very sentimental so their kindness in welcoming back  to the shop almost brought tears to my eyes.

The dish is still as I remember. Presented in a large bowl, rich with toppings, and still with lip-smacking sauce. I no longer pick up the bowl at the end, but the thought did cross my mind. When you come into the store you place your order with the cashier. For this dish, be sure to ask for the hiyashi chuka goma dare. I don’t care for Japanese mustard so I also request karashi nuki.

Sapporoya is just minutes from Tokyo Station on the Yaesu side.

Nihonbashi Sapporoya 札幌や

Chuo-ku, Nihonbashi 3-3-5, B1

Monday – Friday 11:00~14:30 17:00~21:00

Saturday 11:00~14:30

closed Sunday and holidays

Chef Nicolas Boujéma of Signature at Mandarin Oriental

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There is a new French chef in town, Nicolas Boujéma, at Signature in the Mandarin Oriental. I was very curious to try his food as he has a very impressive resumé, most recently coming from Pierre Gagnaire in Hong Kong. I had the chance to interview him for Metropolis magazine for a Tastemaker piece. It’s always exciting to see a chef who is new to Japan explore the local ingredients. Boujéma is a talented chef and it will be fun to revisit and see how his cuisine evolves as he experiences the changing produce and seafood. He lives near Tsukiji Market and visits often, and says that he finds a lot of inspiration there.

Louis Roederer champagne to start, a lovely wine. This table overlooks Tokyo station, the Bank of Japan, and the historic Nihonbashi district where the Mandarin Oriental is located.

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Some lovely amuse bouche to start includes smoked eel, an aromatic muscat, and gougère.

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An earthy Australian truffle soup, ravioli foie gras, with a light vegetable broth. It is well balanced and not too heavy, and just sexy enough with the truffles. Which makes me feel guilty for indulging in something so nice before dinner.Sig4

Saffron butter and whipped butter. Excellent bread is being made in house  like this petit baguette and brioche. The saffron butter was a very nice touch.

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Tavel Chateau d’Aquéria is a lovely rosé and perfect not only on a hot summer day, as this was, but also with the sardine and tomato dish it was served with.Sig6

Lovely presentation of iwashi (sardine) that is marinated in salt, lemon juice,  and olive oil. It’s served with a refreshing tomato terrine, goat cheese from Loire, Italian ham, and mustard crouton. Again, the dish is well-balanced and not too rich, as one would expect from iwashi.

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Alsace is one of my favorite wine regions for its aromatic white wines with a crisp acidity. It is the wine I choose when we are out and celebrating a special occasion. When the sommelier brought this to the table I couldn’t stop smiling. I was told that a former Japanese sommelier at Signature married into the Hugel family and is now living in Alsace. This was riesling was nice with this next dish.

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My favorite dish of the meal was this amazing combination of truffles, waffle, braised shallots, leeks, mushrooms, and whipped cream with truffles. The leek was sliced thin and painted onto the plate. The waffle pockets were stuffed with braised shallots and served with a lovely Port sauce. And again, a hedonistic course with truffles. Had I been at home I would have picked up the plate and licked it clean. Sig9

Francois Villard Condrieu Les Terraces du Palaix. Lovely aromatics in this viognier. This floral Rhone wine is perfect for the accompanying fish main dish which reminded me of the Mediterranean.Sig10

Bouillabaise inspired cod, amadai sashimi, eggplant puree with lemon, zucchini, and fennel. The warm breeze of the south of France. A nice touch of amadai (tile fish) sashimi with the cod. Sig11

Potato espumante with saffron is a refreshing palate cleanser before the cheese course.Sig12

Macon La Roche Vineuse Gamay – lovely with the cheese! Fruity yet with a nice backbone.
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48 months aged Comte cheese which I am told is very rare. It is prepared with truffles, a white pepper cream, and shaved with some sweet jelly, and brioche in the middle. Muscat grape and dragon fruit. A luxurious course and so nice to see the cheese served three ways.

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Hakuto peaches espumante. A wonderful, light finish and a nice touch as peaches are at the peak of their seasonality in Japan at the moment. Sig15

And a few sweet touches to end a lovely lunch.

It’s always exciting to welcome a new chef to Tokyo. Be sure to put Signature on your Go List for Tokyo. Excellent food, outstanding service, knowledgeable sommeliers, and spectacular views – day or night. It will be fun to watch his cuisine evolve as he acquaints himself with the seasonal Japanese ingredients.

Signature at the Mandarin Oriental

Nihonbashi Muromachi 2-1-1

Chuo-ku, Tokyo

Reservations: 03-3270-8188

http://www.mandarinoriental.com/tokyo/fine-dining/signature/

Nihonbashi Yukari Summer Lunch

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Nihonbashi Yukari is one of my favorite restaurants in Tokyo for a kaiseki meal. Chef Kimio Nonaga is the 2002 Iron Chef champion from the original series. I’ve included many Yukari Gozen lunches on this blog and it’s a beautiful way to taste seasonal ingredients exquisitely presented.

This lunch in early June starts with a chilled chawanmushi topped with a hydrangea flower picked from the small garden in front of the restaurant. Hydrangeas (ajisai) are blossoming all over Tokyo but it’s an unexpected treat when it is presented with your meal. A gentle reminder to the time of year.

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Chawanmushi is a savory egg custard, usually served hot. But on this hot summer morning he serves a very soft custard that is topped with a thick slurry. It’s a unique flavor and texture that I’ve never had before and I have a hard time imagining what it could be. Nonaga-san says that it is dashi mixed with Jersey mozzarella cheese made in Tokyo at Isonuma Farms in Hachioji. It adds to the dish a creamy texture.

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Here is the lunch, presented in a lacquer box and is a generous lunch, so come hungry.Nonaga4

Another look at the lacquer box with all of its components. A fried course, a sashimi course, a simmered course, and the top right box which includes small bites prepared in a variety of ways.Nonaga5

 

Another overview of the lunch including young ginger rice, miso soup, and pickles.

Nonaga6Top left is the simmered course with ganmodoki (deep-fried tofu) and nama fu, a lovely wheat gluten that is a treat as at our home we only have the dried version of fu which doesn’t have the chewy texture of nama fu.

Top right are the small bites including a savory fuki miso garnished with pine nuts, yokan sweet cake made with amazu (tart plum vinegar), and a sweet egg omelet.

Bottom left is the otsukuri (sashimi) course of scallops, horse mackerel, and North Pacific giant octopus topped with vegetables and a creamy green dressing made from shiso.

Bottom right is the deep-fried course of shishitō and shiitake tempura, baby ayu that is covered with sticky rice balls and deep-fried and yuba stuffed with shrimp paste and deep-fried.

As you can see, it is a variety of colors, flavors, and textures. For those who want to experience kaiseki cuisine this is a great lunch in Tokyo.

 

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Nonaga-san is known for serving desserts, not just cut fruit, at the end of each meal. Today it is a mattcha babaloa made with yogurt. It is served with a creamy, sweet azuki bean paste and sticky rice balls.

Nonaga exterior

The entrance to Nihonbashi Yukari. Can you see the lavender hydrangeas that were used for the first course? If you come, tell Nonaga-san that Yukari sent you. The recommended lunch is the Yukari Gozen as seen here for 3,675 JPY. It must be reserved in advance when making your reservation. Alternative lunch options include sashimi, tempura, or grilled seafood. Nine-course kaiseki dinner starts at 10,500 JPY, a bargain and great value for a kaiseki evening. Nihonbashi Yukari is a five-minute walk from Tokyo station’s Yaesu exit. It is also around the corner from Takashimaya’s flagship store.

Nihonbashi Yukari

Chuo-ku, Nihonbashi 3-2-14

03-3271-3436

closed Sunday and holidays

Kimio Nonaga on Twitter

Kimio Nonaga on Facebook

 

Japanese Fruit Shops – Nihonbashi Sembikiya 日本橋千疋屋

*All photos by Aiste Miseviciute of Luxeat. Check out her blog for many beautiful photos of her meals in Japan.

A visit to Japan for any foodie would not be complete without a careful peruse of the upscale fruit shops. My personal favorite is Nihonbashi Sembikiya, which is Japan’s oldest fruit shop. Sembikiya originated in 1834 in Koshigaya, north of Tokyo. It was started by a samurai and moved to the mercantile district of Nihonbashi in 1867. Japan’s first fruit restaurant, selling then opened in 1887. The restaurant was the forerunner to the modern day fruit parlor. It is at the fruit parlors where customers can sit and enjoy freshly squeezed fruit juices and sliced fruits as well as parfaits.

Sembikiya Melon 1

Perhaps the most famous of Japanese fruit is the muskmelon. Here it is wrapped up.Sembikiya Melon 2

Yes, in a wooden box and cradled with packaging to prevent it from bruising.Sembikiya Melon 3

The muskmelon from Sembikiya all come from Shizuoka prefecture. Shizuoka was selected as it gets a lot of sunshine. In the summertime the melons are kept cool with air-conditioning; in the wintertime, kept warm with heaters. And, on each plant only one melon is left to grow while all of the others are cut off. This is so that all of the water and sunlight will be used to nurture the one melon.
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And, here are the results. A juicy, sweet muskmelon that melts in your mouth.

When purchasing one of these gift melons the store clerk will ask you on which day it will be eaten. They then select one in your price range that will be at its peak time for consumption on that day. This melon was purchased five days before it was going to be eaten. It cost about 12,000 JPY (or about $120 USD at current exchange rates). Aiste, of Luxeat, who purchased this was advised to keep the melon out at room temperature until she was ready to eat it. Then, to put it in the fridge about two hours before to cool it down.

If you will be visiting Tokyo the best way to try a slice of one of these melons is to visit a fruit parlor. Nihonbashi Sembikiya has a café on the first floor next to the fruit shop, Caffe di FESTA, for purchasing freshly squeezed juices and fruit shakes. The second floor is a proper restaurant where sliced fruits, parfaits, and curries made with fruit are served. Depachika, the epicurean food halls in the basement of department stores, also have eat-in counters where customers can indulge in sliced fruits, freshly squeezed juices, and other fruit-based sweets. Here is a list of my favorite depachika in Tokyo.

Sembikiya Biwa

In this photo are Nagasaki biwa (loquats, Eriobotrya japonica), in season in the spring. These tangy and sweet fruit can be eaten fresh or simmered in a simple syrup. It is also lovely in a gelatin. 8,925 JPY per box.

Sembikiya Fuji Apples

The apple season is just ending its season in Japan. These red Fuji apples come from Aomori prefecture in the north of Japan. Aiste bought some apples and the store clerk had advised her that the peak “shun” or best time for eating apples had passed and that these apples were not as sweet as they are in January or February. She bought one and gave it to me and I have to agree with the store clerk. It was not as juicy or sweet as they can be. 1,050 JPY per apple.

Sembikiya Mango

Miyazaki, on the southern island of Kyushu, reminds me of Hawaii. Arriving at the airport one is greeted with palm trees and a coastal breeze. Miyazaki is known for many food and beverages such as shōchū, jidori (local chicken), and mangoes. These juicy fruit bombs can be super sweet and very tender. One Miyazaki mango can go for as much as 20,000 JPY. As you can see, the high-end fruit come in wooden boxes and are cradled with packaging to prevent it from bruising. The package on the right with two mangoes and flowers are being promoted as a special gift for Mother’s Day.

Sembikiya Muskmelon

Here are two Shizuoka muskmelon for 23,100 JPY presented in a wooden box.

Sembikiya Suika

Suika (watermelon) are just now coming into season in Japan. These Kodama suika from Gunma prefecture are perfectly round and go for 4,200 JPY.
Sembikiya Cherries

The most impressive display of fresh fruit are these wooden boxes of sakurarnbo cherries from Yamagata prefecture. The box on the right has 40 cherries all of the same size that are lined up in perfect rows for an astonishing 21,525 JPY (over $200 USD). That is about $5 USD per cherry.

On the depachika food tours we do for Food Sake Tokyo  we visit a fruit shop in a department store basement. Clients are always surprised at the exorbitant price of the fruit in these shops. Of course, this is not where we go to buy fruit to eat at home. Fruit purchased here is part of the rich gift-giving culture in Japan. As Mother’s Day is coming up there are many signs at Sembikiya suggesting giving fruit to your mother as a gift. Fruit are also popular as gifts for elderly friends or if someone is in the hospital.

Be sure to visit a fruit shop when you are in Japan. Indulge in a slice of muskmelon or some freshly squeezed fruit juice at the fruit parlor.

Nihonbashi Sembikiya

Chuo-ku, Nihonbashi Muromachi 2-1-2, Nihonbashi Mitsui Tower

Phone: 03-3241-1630 (fruit parlor and restaurant)

Fruit shop and Caffe di FESTA hours 9:00 – 19:00 daily

Nihonbashi Yukari Spring Bento

Yukari 1

Chawanmushi

Nihonbashi Yukari is one of my favorite restaurants in Tokyo. Chef Kimio Nonaga is the 2002 Iron Chef Champion, from the original series. He is the third-generation chef of a kaiseki restaurant that is located in the historic district on Nihonbashi. His restaurant is about a three minute walk from Tokyo Station’s Yaesu exit.

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On this chilly spring day he starts his lunch course with a savory, warm egg custard, chawanmushi. Inside of the custard is anago eel and it is topped with some grated ginger, which helps warm up the body.

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I like to request a seat at the counter so that chef Nonaga can answer questions about the different ingredients and cooking techniques. He’s very passionate about Japanese cuisine and enjoys sharing his knowledge with diners. He doesn’t speak English so it’s best to go with a Japanese speaker.

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The bentō lunch needs to requested when making your reservation. It is a mini-kaiseki meal as it includes a variety of dishes incorporating seasonal ingredients that are prepared using different cooking techniques.

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One of chef Nonaga’s signature dishes is a Japanese dish made from chicken liver that is topped with keshi no mi. It is not served with the bentō, but we were talking about Valentine’s Day and chocolate and he paired this with some chocolate.

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While it is called a bentō, it is an extravagant affair that is presented in a lacquer box. It’s quite a feast:

Sashimi topped with a nattō dressing that he created with an Ibaraki nattō purveyor.

Tender Yamagata pork kakuni.

Tempura of shishitō pepper, shiitaké mushroom, wakasagi Japanese smelt that is is rolled in komé-ko (rice flour) before deep-fried, and kakiagé – a melange of seafood and vegetables deep-fried in a little cake.

Rice is studded with benidaizu red beans from Yamagata, and more.

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With the tsukuri, sashimi course, chef Nonaga puts some nattō dressing on it. There was also something crunchy. I asked him if it was dried nattō beans and he said that it was deep-fried anago bones. A great example that nothing goes to waste in the Japanese kitchen.

 

 

 

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Nihonbashi Yukari is the rare kaiseki restaurant that serves dessert. This day it is a mattcha yogurt babaloa with a strawberry from Ibaraki, azuki paste, and wasanbon sugar.

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And, as if that was not enough, chef Nonaga gave us a second dessert. A cookies and cream ice cream that had some ground coffee in it.

There are so many things why this is a favorite of mine. The location can’t be beat as it is in the heart of the city. Chef Nonaga is full of personality and sitting at the counter, I always learn new things about Japanese cuisine. The food incorporates seasonal ingredients – and many of it from Tokyo, including Tokyo Bay. Finally, it is a bargain when compared to similar restaurants. A client recently dined here twice during her stay in Tokyo and she wrote about it on her blog. If you go, please tell chef Nonaga that Yukari sent you.

Nihonbashi Yukari

Chuo-ku, Nihonbashi 3-2-14

Food Sake Tokyo Update – Kiya Nihonbashi has moved

Kiya Knife Shop 木屋 *Note – this is the NEW address for Kiya Nihonbashi

Nihonbashi-Muromachi 2-2-1 中央区日本橋室町 2-2-1

Chuo-Ku Tokyo Coredo-Muromachi. 1F

Tel 03-3241-0110

STORE HOURS
10am – 8pm seven days a week
Closed only on New Year’s Day.

www.kiya-hamono.co.jp/english/index.html (English)

The corner shop, opened in 1792, has a sign in English, “World’s Finest Cutlery” over the door. The compact shop displays a shining collection of knives, pots, pans, and many things for the kitchen. Here you will find graters, pepper grinders, tweezers for pulling bones out of fish, as well as scissors and gardening tools. The friendly staff is patient and will help you to find exactly what you are looking for.